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Will Knowledge of Gene-based Colorectal Cancer Disease Risk Influence Quality of Life and Screening Behavior? Findings from a Population-based Study

Ramsey, Scott and Blough, David and McDermott, Cara and Clarke, Lauren and Bennett, Robin and Burke, Wylie and Newcomb, Polly (2010) Will Knowledge of Gene-based Colorectal Cancer Disease Risk Influence Quality of Life and Screening Behavior? Findings from a Population-based Study. Public Health Genomics, 13 (1). pp. 1-12. ISSN 1662-4246

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Abstract

Background/Aims: Several gene variants conveying modestly increased risk for disease have been described for colorectal cancer. Patient acceptance of gene variant testing in clinical practice is not known. We evaluated the potential impact of hypothetical colorectal cancer associated gene variant testing on quality of life, health habits, and cancer screening behavior. Methods: First-degree relatives of colorectal cancer patients and controls from the Seattle Colorectal Cancer Familial Registry were invited to participate in a web-based survey regarding colorectal cancer risk gene variant testing. Results: 310 relatives and 170 controls completed the questionnaire. Quality of life for the hypothetical carrier state was modestly but non-significantly lower than current health after adjustment for sociodemographic and health factors. In the positive test scenario, 30% of respondents expressed willingness to change their diet, 25% would increase exercise, and 43% would start colorectal cancer screening. The proportions willing to modify these habits did not differ between groups. Conclusions: Testing for gene variants associated with colorectal cancer risk may not influence quality of life, but may impact health habits and screening adherence. Changing behaviors as a result of testing may help to reduce cancer incidence and mortality, particularly among those at higher risk for colorectal cancer.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article is available to subscribers only via the URL above to subscribers only.
DOI: 10.1159/000206346
PubMed ID: 20160979
NIHMSID: NIHMS102310
PMCID: PMC2760996
Grant Numbers: R01 CA114794-03
Subjects: Diseases > Solid tumors > Digestive system cancer
Health Care > Risk and Preventive Health Services > Screening
Psychology > Quality of Life
Research Methodologies > Epidemiology > Risk assessment
Depositing User: Library Staff
Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2009 19:43
Last Modified: 14 Feb 2012 14:42
URI: http://authors.fhcrc.org/id/eprint/239

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