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Disparities in breast cancer characteristics and outcomes by race/ethnicity.

Ooi, Siew Loon and Martinez, Maria Elena and Li, Christopher I (2010) Disparities in breast cancer characteristics and outcomes by race/ethnicity. Breast cancer research and treatment, 127 (3). pp. 729-738. ISSN 1573-7217

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Article URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/4g3355q958554t...

Abstract

Disparities in breast cancer stage and mortality by race/ethnicity in the United States are persistent and well known. However, few studies have assessed differences across racial/ethnic subgroups of women broadly defined as Hispanic, Asian, or Pacific Islander, particularly using more recent data. Using data from 17 population-based cancer registries in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, we evaluated the relationships between race/ethnicity and breast cancer stage, hormone receptor status, treatment, and mortality. The cohort consisted of 229,594 women 40-79 years of age diagnosed with invasive breast carcinoma between January 2000 and December 2006, including 176,094 non-Hispanic whites, 20,486 Blacks, 15,835 Hispanic whites, 14,951 Asians, 1,224 Pacific Islanders, and 1,004 American Indians/Alaska Natives. With respect to statistically significant findings, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian Indian/Pakistani, Black, Filipino, Hawaiian, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Samoan women had 1.3-7.1-fold higher odds of presenting with stage IV breast cancer compared to non-Hispanic white women. Almost all groups were more likely to be diagnosed with estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptor-negative (ER-/PR-) disease with Black and Puerto Rican women having the highest odds ratios (2.4 and 1.9-fold increases, respectively) compared to non-Hispanic whites. Lastly, Black, Hawaiian, Puerto Rican, and Samoan patients had 1.5-1.8-fold elevated risks of breast cancer-specific mortality. Breast cancer disparities persist by race/ethnicity, though there is substantial variation within subgroups of women broadly defined as Hispanic or Asian. Targeted, multi-pronged interventions that are culturally appropriate may be important means of reducing the magnitudes of these disparities.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The final publication is available at www.springerlink.com
DOI: 10.1007/s10549-010-1191-6
PubMed ID: 21076864
NIHMSID: NIHMS262866
PMCID: PMC3081535
Grant Numbers: R25 CA094880-10
Subjects: Diseases > Solid tumors > Breast cancer
Depositing User: Library Staff
Date Deposited: 09 Aug 2011 18:51
Last Modified: 16 Sep 2015 07:17
URI: http://authors.fhcrc.org/id/eprint/471

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