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Novel methods for discriminating behavioral differences between stickleback individuals and populations in a laboratory shoaling assay

Wark, Abigail R. and Wark,, Barry J. and Lageson, Tessa J. and Peichel, Catherine L. (2011) Novel methods for discriminating behavioral differences between stickleback individuals and populations in a laboratory shoaling assay. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 65 (5). pp. 1147-1157. ISSN 0340-5443

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Article URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/lp437224767635...

Abstract

Threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from different habitats have been observed to differ in shoaling behavior, both in the wild and in laboratory studies. In the present study, we surveyed the shoaling behavior of sticklebacks from a variety of marine, lake, and stream habitats throughout the Pacific Northwest. We tested the shoaling tendencies of 113 wild-caught sticklebacks from 13 populations using a laboratory assay that was based on other published shoaling assays in sticklebacks. Using traditional behavioral measures for this assay, such as time spent shoaling and mean position in the tank, we were unable to find population differences in shoaling behavior. However, simple plotting techniques revealed differences in spatial distributions during the assay. When we collapsed individual trials into population-level data sets and applied information theoretic measurements, we found significant behavioral differences between populations. For example, entropy estimates confirm that populations display differences in the extent of clustering at various tank positions. Using log-likelihood analysis, we show that these population-level observations reflect consistent differences in individual behavioral patterns that can be difficult to discriminate using standard measures. The analytical techniques we describe may help improve the detection of potential behavioral differences between fish groups in future studies.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
DOI: 10.1007/s00265-010-1130-x
Depositing User: Library Staff
Date Deposited: 17 May 2011 15:33
Last Modified: 16 Sep 2015 07:17
URI: http://authors.fhcrc.org/id/eprint/489

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